Window on my world — 09 August 2013

It now has been 17 years since I started pushing a cab around London looking for fares and in that time I’ve probably driven most post-war taxis.
Even before I had qualified going to a trade exhibition at Islington’s Business Design Centre got me a test drive in one of those boxy Metros.
They always had trouble shifting those utilitarian boring beasts.

When I was first let loose on the streets of London my baptism of fire was an old – no very old – FX4. Registered in 1982 at a time when air conditioning was something an East Ender massaged into their hair, and without power steering, your arms would ache negotiating its two tonnes of steel around London with a penchant for swinging left unannounced when squeezing between tight gaps.

When the old girl gasped its last (well the drive to the meter broke) it was saying just let me die in peace, I’ve taken my last paying passenger.

A succession of Fairways followed some you couldn’t lock the doors, others that the only means of exiting the driver’s compartment was via the window and opening the door from the outside. One vehicle accumulated rainwater beneath the for hire sign to ensure the driver had a shower whenever he had occasion to brake heavily.

I’ve owned a more modern TX1, its shape unfairly likened to a blancmange, as with most of its siblings it had the ability to track down top secret transmissions. Perplexedly at certain ‘hot spots’ (outside the Langham Hotel is one of them), the central locking on the fob key would fail to work, occasioning a complicated procedure punching in PIN numbers to get the vehicle started again.

I should have headed this post ‘Tickled Pink’ but some enterprising cabbie has beaten me to that for recently I have been driving a pink cab in what must be the most photographed cab in London.

A neighbour, also a cabbie, declared that it matched my eyes, while I’ve received opprobrium from Aussies standing outside a local hostelry, “strewth mate!” I think was the refrain at the time.

My postman just had to knock to deliver a parcel which clearly fitted the letterbox, so he could voice his mirth at seeing ‘Pinky’ parked outside.

Ladies would choose my distinctive livery over my more conservative colleagues while many will strike up a conversation, rather a novelty for decades the fair sex have ignored my presence.

Henry Ford might have generated the quip:

any customer can have a car
painted any colour that he wants
so long as it’s black





He realised that drying paint took the longest of any step in the assembly line and had his factory switch to the fastest drying paint they could find, which, of course, was black. But I think old HF would be speechless at the sight of Pinky.

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Gibson

(2) Readers Comments

  1. BACK TO BLACK?
    Nice piece! Most of us older drivers have similar FX4 or Fairway memories and I for one think we’re worse off now. We’ve prematurely lost an iconic vehicle that, with sufficient commitment, could’ve been improved instead of suffering this juicy, expensive Noddy car. Claims that the TX was designed for and with drivers are hard to stomach. My 6’3″ body doesn’t fit into it.
    And we’re now on the precipice of being flooded by various converted vans. Given the danger of further blurring the lines between us and PH with the advent of such vehicles, maybe it’s worth going back to exclusively black taxis, no ads, no wraps and let PH have any OTHER colour they want. Eh, Mr Ford?

    • That is a great suggestion ‘Private Hire can have any colour other than black’

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